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Twitter analysis and health care worker surveys give new insights into COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy

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Twitter analysis and health care worker surveys give new insights into COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy

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Health care workers are among the most trusted messengers of COVID-19 vaccine information, but many fail to leverage that trust on social media to encourage vaccination, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health that reveals vaccination motivations and hesitancies among health care workers and how those feelings are shared on social media.

The findings, published today in the Journal of Community Health, point to new messages about COVID-19 vaccination—such as those involving freedom—that public health practitioners and clinicians can use to connect with patients, colleagues and community members. Combined with techniques that foster constructive conversations, the Pitt researchers believe the insights gleaned from their study can turn the tide on vaccine hesitancy.

“In the survey, health care workers gave us really compelling, heartwarming reasons why they got vaccinated, but we didn’t see a lot of that data on social media,” said lead author Beth Hoffman, M.P.H., a doctoral candidate in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences at Pitt Public Health. “It speaks to the importance not only of health care workers sharing their stories, but also providing them support to do so. It’s not enough to say, ‘You should share your story.’ We need to offer training on how they can do that.”

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Hoffman and senior author Jaime Sidani, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor at Pitt Public Health, partnered with scientists in the Department of Psychiatry at Pitt’s School of Medicine to survey hundreds of health care workers at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital about COVID-19 vaccination. They also analyzed a sample of thousands of tweets to learn similarities and differences between survey responses and what they saw on Twitter.

The team defined “health care worker” as anyone working in the hospital to provide for patients, including nurses, cafeteria staff, therapists, security personnel and physicians. Coauthor Antoine Douaihy, M.D., professor of psychiatry and medicine at Pitt, explained it was particularly insightful to get COVID-19 vaccination views of employees at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital—one of the largest free-standing psychiatric hospitals in the nation—because the patients they serve are often stigmatized.

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“COVID-19 vaccination uptake among our patients is low because of historical and cultural issues that get in the way of people accepting the vaccine,” Douaihy said. “Learning about the motivations of the health care workers who interact with them can teach us how to connect and build trust with patients.”

Of the 511 health care workers who responded between April and June 2021, 93.2% reported receiving at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and a third of them said they’d posted about receiving the vaccine on social media.

Among a random sample of almost 2,300 tweets about COVID-19 vaccination, the team determined 1,863 were authored by individuals. Of those, 6% were authored by people who identified as a health care worker or health sciences student. The majority of those—95%—were either positive or neutral, but only 14% included a personal narrative, despite previous research demonstrating that tweets in which physicians share personal stories are deemed most effective at motivating others to action.

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In both the social media analysis and the health care worker surveys, the researchers identified “freedom” as a powerful motivational theme, which suggests that emphasizing “freedom from fear” once vaccinated could be effective at reducing vaccine hesitancy. Addressing misinformation related to reproductive health and vaccination, as well as making vaccine clinics accessible and convenient, were other insights the scientists gleaned from the research.

Coauthor Cassandra Boness, Ph.D., who began this research while at Pitt and is now a research assistant professor at the University of New Mexico, said these kinds of findings are important for public health practitioners using social media to improve vaccination rates and clinicians talking with their patients.

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“These insights can inform a practice called ‘motivational interviewing,’ which is a brief, nonconfrontational, empathic approach using a guiding style to connect with patients and facilitate health-related behavior change,” Boness said. “Talking with someone about the COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t have to be a time-consuming lecture—in fact, that probably won’t work. Rather, hearing their concerns, sharing personal experiences and giving thoughtful feedback that validates and explores those concerns—something that can take less than 10 minutes—is far more powerful.”

Additional authors on this study are Kar-Hai Chu, Ph.D., M.S., Riley Wolynn, Larissa Sallowicz and Elizabeth M. Felter, Dr.P.H., all of Pitt, and Dino Mintas, J.D., of VISIMO.



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Twitter analysis and health care worker surveys give new insights into COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy (2022, June 8)
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Lululemon Is Moving Tons of Summer-Ready Apparel to Sale Right Now

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Lululemon Is Moving Tons of Summer-Ready Apparel to Sale Right Now

lululemon sale june 2022

Courtesy of Retailer

When it comes to curating a sale that us guys actually want to shop, Lululemon is one of the best at making it happen. Recently, the legacy performance wear brand added tons of summer-ready apparel to its We Made Too Much sale section. While supplies last, you can shop up to 50% off some of Lululemon’s best-selling styles in shorts, tees, swimwear, and more.

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While there’s a ton of gym wear in this sale, our favorite aspect is the surprising amount of casual pieces you can find. Because Lululemon has some of the best lightweight and breathable fabric blends around, you can pick up sleek garments like the Venture Long Sleeve Shirt (50% off) and ABC Jogger (30% off) and wear them out to your summer dinners without feeling too dressed-down. And if you’re looking for casual clothes with versatility—like pieces you can wear to play golf or to a ball game—you can find several colors on sale in styles like the Airing Easy Short Sleeve Buttondown (27% off) and the City Sweat Short (43% off).

The best deals are the ones you get to first, so make sure to act fast on these new sale styles. Whether you’re looking for new gym gear or everyday apparel, we’ve got you covered on all the latest sale restocks from Lululemon!

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Gear and Commerce Editor
John Thompson is the Gear and Commerce Editor at Men’s Health, where he covers fashion, grooming, gear, and technology.

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Everything We Know About Umbrella Academy Season 4

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Everything We Know About Umbrella Academy Season 4

Warning: This article contains spoilers for Umbrella Academy Season 3.


The Umbrella Academy family has been through a lot. They’ve traveled through time, stopped the apocalypse twice, and done it all in a matter of days, if we’re tracking their achievements in real time. Still, the team’s unexpected superhero days are far from over.

At the end of Season 3, we didn’t get many answers, just more questions. Now that our world is destroyed, where did everyone end up? How are Allison’s daughter and Ray together in the same timeline? Where’s Sloane? And what is the Sparrow Academy’s Ben doing on that train? Is there any way to return the world to how it was?

That’s not even mentioning Reginald Hargreeves. Despite how he came off to Klaus throughout most of Season 3, Reginald is still as devious as ever. But from the Season 3 finale, it looks like we’ll finally get some clarity on what all his secret planning was for. It looks like he has a woman named Abigail standing with him in the new reality he destroyed the world to create. And if his willingness to trick his children and the Umbrella Academy into doing his bidding is any indication, he’ll do anything to get what he wants. The remaining Sparrows and the Umbrella Academy may all have to band together to defeat Reginald.

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The only thing we know for sure is that there’s a clear set-up for a Season 4 of The Umbrella Academy. Here’s everything we know about a potential Season 4 of The Umbrella Academy. We’ll update this space with the latest news.

Will There Be a Season 4 of The Umbrella Academy?

Since the show’s Season 3 just premiered, it could be too soon for Netflix to give it a green light. How many people tune into the new season could be the data the streaming service uses to determine whether or not The Umbrella Academy gets a renewal.

Steve Blackman, who created the Netflix adaptation of The Umbrella Academy, told Men’s Health he already has plans for what he wants to do for the next season, and will answer many of the unanswered questions left after the Season 3 finale, including that mysterious post-credits scene.

“I can only tell you it is the Ben from the Sparrow timeline,” Blackman says. “It is the Ben you’ve seen all season long. I can’t tell you why he’s there, or what the glasses are all about, but that is the Ben from the Sparrow Academy. Everything else will be answered next year.”

He also revealed to The Wrap that he initially pitched the show to last for four seasons, but there’s been no word yet on if it’ll actually be the end for the superpowered family.

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“I think if we got to Season 4, it would be a great ending for the run of the show,” he told the publication. “I’m not saying I couldn’t do more, but you know, I think that would be very satisfying for the audience, four seasons.”

Having said all that, Netflix only has one more season of Stranger Things, and after that, The Umbrella Academy may just be its most popular genre show. It would be shocking if we didn’t see the Umbrellas (and the remaining Sparrows) back for more.

When Will Season 4 of The Umbrella Academy come out?

Until we get official confirmation of another season, we can’t say anything for sure. But in the meantime, get clarity on some of the major twists in Season 3, like who the mysterious old man is, or a breakdown of the Sparrow Academy, and check out our interview with creator Steve Blackman.

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Fit Kids More Likely to Stay Mentally Sharp with Age: Study

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Fit Kids More Likely to Stay Mentally Sharp with Age: Study

June 27, 2022 – Physical activity helps kids build strong muscles and bones and lowers the risk of things like heart disease and diabetes later in life. Now, there’s yet another reason to encourage your child to move: It may help them stay mentally sharp for decades.

A new study done by researchers in Australia followed 1,200 people for 30 years and revealed a link between childhood fitness and mental performance in middle age.

The study began in 1985. It looked at people between the ages of 7 and 15 at the time, who were assessed for heart and lung fitness, power, and endurance, and measured for waist-to-hip ratio. More than 30 years later, those with the highest fitness scores and lower waist-to-hip ratios as kids tended to score better in tests of their thinking skills.

The results, published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, underline the importance of exercise not just for a healthy body but for a healthy brain. And to reap the full benefit, we may need to start as far back as early childhood.

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Fit Body, Fit Brain

Previous research has linked adult fitness with better thinking skills and a lower risk of dementia later in life, though this study is the first to link childhood fitness to those outcomes.

That link remained even after controlling for things like academic performance, social and economic status, smoking, and alcohol consumption, says Michele Callisaya, PhD, a study co-author and associate professor from the National Centre for Healthy Ageing at Peninsula Health and Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. (Researchers from the University of Tasmania also worked on the study.)

High fitness levels help new neurons, connections, and blood vessels form in the brain, Callisaya says, which may explain the protective effect. What’s more, healthy behaviors may be more likely to stick if we start when we’re young, she says.

One surprising finding: While being fit as a kid was linked to higher scores in things like processing speed and attention, it had no impact on memory.

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“This might be because the cognitive functions of processing speed and attention start to decline in midlife,” Callisaya says. “Memory generally starts to decline later.”

Tips for Parents

Children over 6 should get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity every day, according to the U.S. physical activity guidelines. That’s in line with Australian guidelines as well, Callisaya notes.

“It’s important to remember this can be doing fun things like running around the park,” she says. “Making physical activity a positive experience and fun is important.”

And be sure you get in there and run around with them: Setting a good example is a key way to help prevent health problems, she says.

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And here’s another strategy: Try cutting back on screen time. A separate study from Denmark suggests this may be a good way to get kids moving more. In fact, kids whose screen time was limited to 3 hours a week had an average of 45 minutes more daily physical activity than those not given a limit.

Surprisingly, screen limits had no impact on the physical activity of parents who also took part in the study, the researchers noted – maybe because children are more spontaneous in their physical activity, compared to adults.

In other words, persuading children to be more active could simply mean encouraging kids to be just that: kids.

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