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Sony rereleases Spider-Man: No Way Home as The More Fun Stuff Version

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Sony rereleases Spider-Man: No Way Home as The More Fun Stuff Version

Spider-Man: No Way Home: The More Fun Stuff Version is a real thing, as Sony decided its biggest Spider-Man movie ever needs a rerelease. After all, Sony thought it was a good idea to rerelease Morbius a few days ago and risk another round of ridicule. At least with No Way Home, there’s no chance of that.

If anything, the No Way Home rerelease will actually help Sony make more money at the box office and push the total box office take over that elusive $2 billion mark. As it is right now, No Way Home passed $1.9 billion during its theatrical run. We usually warn you that spoilers might follow ahead. But this time around, you don’t risk anything. You can, after all, watch No Way Home right now, from the comfort of your home.

What’s new in the Spider-Man: No Way Home: The More Fun Stuff Version rerelease?

Sony announced the No Way Home rerelease out of the blue on Friday. The company will send the movie to theaters on September 2nd in the US and Canada. Other countries should be added to the list in the near future.

Sony’s announcement dropped on social media with the help of a short video clip featuring the film’s three Spider-Man variants. And that’s a great thing about the No Way Home rerelease. Sony can give the film a short promo campaign where it can feature Tom Holland, Tobey Maguire, and Andrew Garfield.

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As the name implies, Spider-Man: No Way Home: The More Fun Stuff Version will be a different movie. It’ll feature additional content, so fans might be getting an extended cut of the film they saw already.

And we think we know exactly what this More Fun Stuff Version will get you: The film’s deleted scenes.

A leaker listed five scenes that should make it into the No Way Home rerelease. These are:

  • Interrogation Scene Extended – 2:25 min
  • Peter Day at Midtown High – 5:25 min
  • Undercroft Montage – 1:35 min
  • Happy’s Very Good Lawyer – 1:35 min
  • The Spideys Hang Out – 4:25 min

If these sound familiar, that’s because we’ve covered them before. We’re looking at over 15 minutes of deleted scenes in the list above. The original cut has a run time of 2 hours and 28 minutes. Add those 15 minutes to it, and you get a movie worth rewatching in theaters.

When will No Way Home hit Disney Plus?

You can watch the movie at home as many times as you want before the rerelease. You can buy the digital or Blu-ray versions of No Way Home right now.

But what you don’t get to do is stream the movie, especially on Disney Plus. This is a Sony project, so it’s not heading to Disney Plus as fast as all the other Marvel MCU titles.

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Spider-Man: No Way Home Blu-ray announcement
Spider-Man: No Way Home Blu-ray announcement: The Spidey meme recreation. Image source: Sony

Fans will have to wait several months for that to happen. And No Way Home will hit various competitors before Disney Plus. Starz, HBO Max, and Netflix are among the streaming services that will probably get No Way Home ahead of Disney.

Some of them will stream No Way Home before the rerelease happens. But don’t expect the deleted scenes to be available on streaming. The More Fun Stuff Version will be saved for theaters, where it might generate that extra $100 million that Sony wants for this Spider-Man story.


More Marvel coverage: For more MCU news, visit our Marvel guide.

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Tesla’s Are Safer and Here is Proof

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Tesla’s Are Safer and Here is Proof




I did some research on Tesla safety using non-Tesla data to address the issue from the AI experts. Some AI experts criticized FSD. I used US, UK government and insurance data to show Tesla is already safer and why we should expect more safety from Autopilot and FSD. I also provided context about where and how accidents and deaths occur with cars.

Are Tesla cars safer and have they saved lives ? Spoiler Yes.

Has Tesla Autopilot saved lives? Again Yes. but I will provide data.

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Is FSD beta safe? Yes,

Is Autopilot safe? How many lives would you expect to save by superior automatic lane keeping? 20-30% of traffic deaths.

Will Full FSD be safer? Yes, and safety score can help ensure it will be.

Can Safety Scoring, Insurance and FSD get more optimal usage of FSD? Yes.

All Tesla’s come with safety features expected to reduce accidents by 30-50% (NHTSA analysis of those features)

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Youtube videos by FSD beta users show large improvement over last 8 months. No major accidents or deaths using FSD beta with 100k users for 7 months

Insurance and government statistics in US and UK show Tesla’s are among the safest cars involved in the fewest accidents. About 40% below average in US. Very Low accidents involvement in UK (10 times less than Toyota, Ford and several others of number per 10,000 cars).

UK Car Statistics

Tesls is among the manufacturers with the least number of accidents per 10,000 models?


Morris – 16


Austin – 26


Tesla – 28


Ferrari – 39


Aston Martin – 40


Lotus – 55


Bentley – 75

This is ten times less than Ford, Toyota and Mercedes in the UK.


Tesla is willing to charge 30-60% less for those with good Tesla Safety Scores. Can motivate 60% safer driving and lower accidents. Safety Scores with Real Time Insurance pricing can motivate safer driving.

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Safety Scoring could be adjusted to ensure FSD monitoring behavior after FSD is fully released for general usage.

Other Nextbigfuture Tesla Videos

2024 Improved Tesla Standard Range Model 3 Will Increase Sales by 50%


Tesla AI Will Supercharge Tesla Profits


Meet Kevin and Bloomberg are Wrong, Volkswagen Will Not be Number 1 in EVs in 2025


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Tesla Real Risks, FUD, Recession and Recovery


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Roe v. Wade Was Overturned. Here’s how Your Phone Could Be Used to Spy on You.

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Roe v. Wade Was Overturned. Here’s how Your Phone Could Be Used to Spy on You.

From figuring out how often you go to the bathroom to potentially being used to prosecute you, your trusty smartphone might not be so trusty in a post-Roe world.


SOPHIE BUSHWICK: If Roe v. Wade is overturned, so-called trigger laws already passed in 13 states could ban abortion in large parts of the country. Here’s how your smartphone could be used to prosecute you if you do decide to have an abortion in an area where it’s criminalized.


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First of all, your phone is a major tracker of personal information.


It records a huge volume of data, your browsing information, location data, and payment history, that, taken together, can reveal your most intimate activities, such as how many times you go to the bathroom.


If a basic activity like reproductive healthcare becomes criminalized, experts say courts could then issue a warrant for your device, which would then reveal all of that personal information.

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If this all sounds a little too dystopian, that’s because it is.


Even with Roe intact, digital footprints have been used against people seeking to terminate pregnancies.


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Imagine a situation where a pregnant person is admitted to the hospital for treatment for a miscarriage.


That person’s phone could then be placed under surveillance under suspicion of having tried to induce that miscarriage.


Not only that; privacy experts warn that law enforcement could actually sidestep the need for a warrant by going directly to private companies.

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So how would that work?


In case you didn’t know, data brokers have been collecting your personal information for years, and they sell that data for a fee.


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Experts say there is actually precedent for law enforcement using data brokers to sidestep the Fourth Amendment.


By issuing a broad subpoena or buying information in bulk, law enforcement could crack down on a large number of people at once.


For example, they could use geofence or other location data, part of your digital footprint, to find everyone who had visited a clinic.

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That information becomes even more revealing when it’s combined with health data.


This is yet another reason why you should check the privacy policy of your period tracking app if you use one.


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That’s because experts warn these apps can actually identify if you’re pregnant before you know it yourself.


And yes, government officials in this country have actually charted people’s periods to determine if they were pregnant.


And know HIPAA, or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is not necessarily going to help you either.

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It’s important to note that apps have no obligation to keep your data secure and private, and HIPAA does not really apply here.


Basically, your vulnerability and privacy is in the hands of the companies that develop these software apps.


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That’s why some privacy advocates call for pressuring these companies directly to keep your data private and safe.There are still ways to protect yourself, but relying on the government or the tech industry to do so isn’t one of them.

Tags:

  • reproductive rights,
  • Reproduction,
  • surveillance,
  • technology,
  • roe v wade

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Deadly Heat Wave’s Lesson: ‘This Is the Future We All Face’

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Deadly Heat Wave’s Lesson: ‘This Is the Future We All Face’

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Sweltering in temperatures 40 degrees Fahrenheit higher than normal in a city where air conditioning isn’t common, Papaefthimiou tried every possible last-ditch effort to help keep residents cool and healthy.


There were the jury-rigged misting stations at public parks, stadium shelters kept open through the night and the hundreds of calls Papaefthimiou and her staff made to subsidized housing managers begging them to check on elderly residents.


Amid it all, she remembers one thought piercing through the 116 F heat: “Oh, eff, this is what climate change does. This is the future we all face.”

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Nearly one year after that heat dome, emergency managers, doctors and even transit systems across the Pacific Northwest say they are taking lessons learned from the unprecedented event to prepare for this summer as climate change increases the likelihood of similar heat domes occurring again.


“It was something that we knew we needed to be preparing for and had put in grant applications for mitigation measures, but when it came, it was just very sobering,” said Lara Whitely Binder, head of climate preparedness in Washington’s King County.


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To understand just how unusual the heat dome’s impact was, it’s best to look at the numbers. An analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that during May and June of 2021, 3,504 people went to emergency rooms for heat-related illnesses in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Region 10 areas, which encompasses the Pacific Northwest.


On June 28, when temperatures peaked at 116 F — 42 degrees higher than the average daily maximum temperature for the region — there were some 2,779 emergency room visits for heat-related illnesses. On the same date one year earlier, there were just nine emergency visits for heat.


‘Damage control’


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Ultimately, more than 160 people died from extreme heat in Oregon and Washington, many of them because they remained in spaces without air conditioning or other means of cooling down.


Dr. Alex St. John, an emergency physician at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, worked just one shift during the heat dome but says the emergency room was as intense as it had been during the first days of the coronavirus pandemic.


“It just felt like there were more patients than we could possibly stay on top of, and we were in a damage-control mode where we were just trying to make sure that all of the sickest people were getting the major treatments they need,” he said.

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One of those patients was an elderly woman who came into the emergency room with a core body temperature of 104 degrees — dangerously hot and close to suffering from fatal heat stroke. To rapidly cool her down, St. John zipped her up to her chest in a black body bag usually meant for corpses and filled it with ice.


St. John did his medical training in Arizona, where he would treat heat illness patients by putting cold, damp cloths on their skin. In the nine years he has been practicing in Seattle, he said he only had to treat a handful of heat-stressed patients and never anyone in such dire straits. He had only heard of using body bags to treat heat stroke days before, when a colleague mentioned exasperation at having to use it themselves.


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Though unconventional, the trick saved the woman’s life. St. John said he wouldn’t hesitate to reach for a body bag to treat heat stroke in the future, but he worries that higher temperatures could one day become so bad and prolonged they would strain the capacity of the hospital cafeteria’s ice machine.


“It was really surreal to be at work in Seattle and having to see patients in worse conditions than I had seen in the Sonoran Desert taking care of people,” he said.


‘Environmental heat is an anomaly’


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While excessive heat would force health impacts in any region, last year’s heat dome was particularly dangerous because residents and municipalities are not used to such high temperatures in the Pacific Northwest.


Many don’t have air conditioning — including Seattle’s own real estate.


During the heat dome, “cooling stations” were set up in just three community centers, in part because the city’s other 21 don’t have air conditioning, said Emergency Planning Coordinator Lucia Schmit.

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“Our response was stymied by the fact that the infrastructure in our city has been built, essentially, to retain heat because environmental heat is an anomaly,” she said.


Those cooling centers were not highly utilized and focus groups since the summer have shown there is a need for cooling centers catering to unique populations. Families with young children want to go to cooling centers in their own neighborhoods where their kids can run around and play, while elderly residents would be more likely to visit centers with quiet areas. People experiencing homelessness, meanwhile, need centers where they can access foods and services.


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But catering to all of those different needs can be tough when schools and other city property in neighborhoods don’t have air conditioning, either. What’s more, the heat dome last year hit while pandemic-related closures meant many library locations were not open, but Schmit said the city and library system are now looking at whether libraries could help folks cool down on hot days.


“We are very bound by the fact that we just don’t have many air-conditioned spaces,” she said.


Emergency planners in King County, which includes Seattle, hit similar obstacles. Emergency Management Director Brendan McCluskey said his team started working with private businesses like Petco to ensure that residents had places to go, even with their pets, to get cool.

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The county also had to open its first-ever, 24-hour cooling shelter when emergency managers realized that temperatures were not cooling down in the evenings as they usually would.


McCluskey said the county was lucky that the heat dome happened between coronavirus waves, so it was able to use a shelter originally set up as a place where people with Covid-19 could isolate as a cooling center instead.


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“That area was not being used, so we quickly repurposed it to allow people to seek shelter from the heat,” he said.


‘A failure of our entire community’


Back in Portland, Papaefthimiou, who is now the city’s chief resilience officer, also found that the cooling centers were underutilized — something she attributes to a lack of understanding among the community that high heat can be dangerous.


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She worries that low-income folks without their own transportation did not want to wait outside in the heat for a bus ride to a cooling shelter or didn’t want to pay for the fare, and so opted to stay home instead. Following the heat dome, the TriMet bus system created a new policy that it would not collect fares from riders traveling to or from cooling shelters any time the state or county issues a heat emergency.


“The people who passed away mostly did not seek help, as far as we know,” Papaefthimiou said. “They just thought that they would stay home and be OK and nobody checked on them. It was a failure of our entire community.”


For this summer, Portland is hoping to engage residents at every level on the importance of heat safety. They are looking to work with community groups to help set up cooling shelters in neighborhood churches or other places where residents might feel more comfortable. The misting stations that were improvised last year will become permanent fixtures at neighborhood playgrounds, too.

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City messaging around heat will include not just the fact that heat kills but also reminders that people should check in on their neighbors and family members who may need help.


What’s more, the city has decided that it will activate National Weather Service wireless emergency alerts to personal cellphones during heat waves reminding people of ways to stay cool.


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“If you are trapped in a sea of heat, that bus is like a lifeboat, it is the thing you have to get on board to be safe, and you can’t be charging people fare to get on the lifeboat,” Papaefthimiou said.


‘Right to Cooling’


Vivek Shandas, director of the Sustaining Urban Places Research Lab at Portland University, said he believes last summer’s heat dome was a wake-up call to city residents and emergency managers alike.


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“I had been working on heat for 15 years, and it was years of talking to folks and getting laughed out of the room when I talked about heat waves because people would say, ‘We will never have heat like that, we have other things to prioritize,’” he said. “Heat never really got much play until last year.”


Shandas said he thinks people will be more cautious in the heat after last year. But while he applauds the city effort to implement more cooling centers in future heat waves, he said he hopes there will be more systematic changes to increase access to cooling in homes.


One such change comes from a study measuring temperatures inside Portland’s public housing units. Several people living in such units died during the heat dome, and now the city and the housing authority are partnering with Portland State University on a project to install temperature sensors in rooms and hallways of public housing units. The sensors will also warn residents when the spaces get dangerously hot.

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“Right now we do not have a good system to alert folks about what they are experiencing in their homes — which can often be hotter than the outdoor temperatures,” Shandas explained.


The Oregon Legislature, too, has already taken steps to protect people from future heat events. Lawmakers this March passed a bill limiting restrictions that landlords and homeowners’ associations can place on portable cooling devices. The legislation, known as the “Right to Cooling” bill, also creates a $34.5 million state program to distribute air conditioners and filters to needy residents during emergencies.


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State Sen. Kayse Jama (D) said during the heat dome he heard from constituents who said they were trying to stay cool but “afraid of being evicted” by landlords who said window units were a safety hazard if they fell down.


“We needed to act quickly and immediately to make sure that the next heat wave we can save lives and protect our vulnerable populations,” he said.


Reprinted from E&E News with permission from POLITICO, LLC. Copyright 2022. E&E News provides essential news for energy and environment professionals.

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