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Call to action: More men step up as reproductive rights advocates

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Call to action: More men step up as reproductive rights advocates

New York

If Donovan Atterberry thought about abortion at all as a young man, it was perhaps with some vague discomfort, or a memory of the anti-abortion protesters outside the clinic that he would pass on his way to the park as a child.

It became real to him in 2013, when his girlfriend, now his wife, became pregnant with their first child together. She’d had a healthy pregnancy before, his stepdaughter, but this time genetic testing diagnosed a disorder in the developing fetus, one that could result in a stillbirth and also possibly put her life at risk during a delivery.

“As a man, I didn’t know how to console her, how to advise her,” Mr. Atterberry recalls. “I said, ‘If I had to choose, I would choose you.’ … It wasn’t a matter of do I believe in abortion or I don’t believe in abortion. At that point, I was thinking about her life.”

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She chose to terminate the pregnancy and “it changed my whole perspective … on bodily autonomy and things of that nature,” said Mr. Atterberry.

So much so, that he now works as a voting engagement organizer for New Voices for Reproductive Justice, which focuses on the health of Black women and girls, with abortion access being among the areas of concern.

“What I’m trying to convey is that it’s a human right for someone to have a choice,” he said.

That Mr. Atterberry is a man in support of abortion rights isn’t unusual; according to polls, a majority of American men say they support some level of access to abortion. And history is replete with men who have played active roles in supporting abortion, through organizations, as legislators and in the case of George Tiller, as an abortion provider. Dr. Tiller was assassinated in church by an anti-abortion extremist in Kansas in 2009.

Still, there is room for a lot more who are willing to speak out and be active in the political battles over abortion availability, Mr. Atterberry says.

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Where men have always played an outsize role is in pushing for and enacting abortion restrictions – as advocates, state elected officials, and most recently, as a U.S. Supreme Court justice. Justice Samuel Alito authored a draft of a high court ruling that would overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision establishing a nationwide right to abortion. The draft, which was leaked to a news outlet last month, appears to have the support of the majority of the six men sitting on the nine-justice court.

Women have always taken the lead in the fight to preserve abortion rights, for obvious reasons: They are the ones who give birth and who, in so many instances, are tasked with caring for children once they are brought into the world.

No one is calling for that leadership to change, said David Cohen, a law professor at Drexel University who specializes in law and gender.

“Men should not be out there trying to run the movement or take away leadership positions,” he said. “But being a part of it, supporting, listening, and being active are all things that men can and should be doing.”

That’s what Oren Jacobson is trying to do at Men4Choice, the organization he co-founded in 2015, where the goal is to get men who say they support abortion rights to speak out and do more, such as protesting, making it a voting priority, and especially talking to other men.

“Everything we’re doing is focused on getting what are really millions of men – who in theory are pro-choice but are completely passive when it comes to their voice and their energy and their time in the fight for abortion rights and abortion access – to get off the sidelines and step in the fight as allies,” he said.

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It hasn’t been the easiest of tasks.

Abortion “is almost never a conversation inside of male circles unless it’s introduced by somebody who is impacted by the issue in most cases,” he said. “Not only that, but … you’re talking about a heavily stigmatized issue in society. You’re talking about sex and sexuality, you’re talking about anatomy, and none of those things are things that guys feel particularly comfortable talking about.”

But it is something that affects them and the culture they live in, notes Barbara Risman, sociology professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

“Sexuality has become so integrated into our lives, whether or not we’re partnered,” she said. “That is directly related to women’s control of fertility – and women do not control fertility in a world where abortion is not legal. … Certainly, heterosexual sexual freedom is dependent on the ability to end an unwanted pregnancy.”

Also, a society in which the state has a say in reproductive decisions could lead to one in which the state has control over other decisions that could affect men more directly, Mr. Cohen said.

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“Abortion law, abortion precedent is not just about abortion, it’s also about controlling intimate details to your life,” he said. “So whether it’s your sex life, your family life, other parts of your private life, medical care, decision-making, all of those are wrapped up into abortion law and abortion jurisprudence and abortion policy,” he said.

Since the Supreme Court draft was leaked, Mr. Jacobson said he’s seen more men speak out about abortion access and show more interest in his group’s work than he has in the past several years.

What remains to be seen, he said, “is whether or not it’s going to catalyze the type of allyship that’s needed now and frankly has been needed for a long time.”

This story was reported by The Associated Press.

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Science

Tesla’s Are Safer and Here is Proof

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Tesla’s Are Safer and Here is Proof




I did some research on Tesla safety using non-Tesla data to address the issue from the AI experts. Some AI experts criticized FSD. I used US, UK government and insurance data to show Tesla is already safer and why we should expect more safety from Autopilot and FSD. I also provided context about where and how accidents and deaths occur with cars.

Are Tesla cars safer and have they saved lives ? Spoiler Yes.

Has Tesla Autopilot saved lives? Again Yes. but I will provide data.

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Is FSD beta safe? Yes,

Is Autopilot safe? How many lives would you expect to save by superior automatic lane keeping? 20-30% of traffic deaths.

Will Full FSD be safer? Yes, and safety score can help ensure it will be.

Can Safety Scoring, Insurance and FSD get more optimal usage of FSD? Yes.

All Tesla’s come with safety features expected to reduce accidents by 30-50% (NHTSA analysis of those features)

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Youtube videos by FSD beta users show large improvement over last 8 months. No major accidents or deaths using FSD beta with 100k users for 7 months

Insurance and government statistics in US and UK show Tesla’s are among the safest cars involved in the fewest accidents. About 40% below average in US. Very Low accidents involvement in UK (10 times less than Toyota, Ford and several others of number per 10,000 cars).

UK Car Statistics

Tesls is among the manufacturers with the least number of accidents per 10,000 models?


Morris – 16


Austin – 26


Tesla – 28


Ferrari – 39


Aston Martin – 40


Lotus – 55


Bentley – 75

This is ten times less than Ford, Toyota and Mercedes in the UK.


Tesla is willing to charge 30-60% less for those with good Tesla Safety Scores. Can motivate 60% safer driving and lower accidents. Safety Scores with Real Time Insurance pricing can motivate safer driving.

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Safety Scoring could be adjusted to ensure FSD monitoring behavior after FSD is fully released for general usage.

Other Nextbigfuture Tesla Videos

2024 Improved Tesla Standard Range Model 3 Will Increase Sales by 50%


Tesla AI Will Supercharge Tesla Profits


Meet Kevin and Bloomberg are Wrong, Volkswagen Will Not be Number 1 in EVs in 2025


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Tesla Real Risks, FUD, Recession and Recovery


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Roe v. Wade Was Overturned. Here’s how Your Phone Could Be Used to Spy on You.

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Roe v. Wade Was Overturned. Here’s how Your Phone Could Be Used to Spy on You.

From figuring out how often you go to the bathroom to potentially being used to prosecute you, your trusty smartphone might not be so trusty in a post-Roe world.


SOPHIE BUSHWICK: If Roe v. Wade is overturned, so-called trigger laws already passed in 13 states could ban abortion in large parts of the country. Here’s how your smartphone could be used to prosecute you if you do decide to have an abortion in an area where it’s criminalized.


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First of all, your phone is a major tracker of personal information.


It records a huge volume of data, your browsing information, location data, and payment history, that, taken together, can reveal your most intimate activities, such as how many times you go to the bathroom.


If a basic activity like reproductive healthcare becomes criminalized, experts say courts could then issue a warrant for your device, which would then reveal all of that personal information.

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If this all sounds a little too dystopian, that’s because it is.


Even with Roe intact, digital footprints have been used against people seeking to terminate pregnancies.


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Imagine a situation where a pregnant person is admitted to the hospital for treatment for a miscarriage.


That person’s phone could then be placed under surveillance under suspicion of having tried to induce that miscarriage.


Not only that; privacy experts warn that law enforcement could actually sidestep the need for a warrant by going directly to private companies.

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So how would that work?


In case you didn’t know, data brokers have been collecting your personal information for years, and they sell that data for a fee.


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Experts say there is actually precedent for law enforcement using data brokers to sidestep the Fourth Amendment.


By issuing a broad subpoena or buying information in bulk, law enforcement could crack down on a large number of people at once.


For example, they could use geofence or other location data, part of your digital footprint, to find everyone who had visited a clinic.

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That information becomes even more revealing when it’s combined with health data.


This is yet another reason why you should check the privacy policy of your period tracking app if you use one.


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That’s because experts warn these apps can actually identify if you’re pregnant before you know it yourself.


And yes, government officials in this country have actually charted people’s periods to determine if they were pregnant.


And know HIPAA, or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is not necessarily going to help you either.

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It’s important to note that apps have no obligation to keep your data secure and private, and HIPAA does not really apply here.


Basically, your vulnerability and privacy is in the hands of the companies that develop these software apps.


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That’s why some privacy advocates call for pressuring these companies directly to keep your data private and safe.There are still ways to protect yourself, but relying on the government or the tech industry to do so isn’t one of them.

Tags:

  • reproductive rights,
  • Reproduction,
  • surveillance,
  • technology,
  • roe v wade

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Chimpanzees hunt for fruit in video game to test navigation skills

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Chimpanzees hunt for fruit in video game to test navigation skills

Testing how chimpanzees navigate in virtual environments could help researchers understand why they prefer certain routes in the wild over others

Life



24 June 2022

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By Jason Arunn Murugesu

New Scientist Default Image

A chimpanzee at Leipzig Zoo

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Chimpanzees in a zoo have been trained to use a touchscreen to navigate a virtual environment and seek out objects. Studies like this could help us learn more about how our close relatives find their way around in the jungle.

“There’s a lot of research on the navigation of birds and bees,” says Matthias Allritz at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. “But we know very little about the navigation of most primate species.” This is largely because chimpanzees are difficult to track in the wild, Allritz says. “Primates are fast and they might go through foliage, which is difficult to follow,” he says.

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Over several weeks, Allritz and his colleagues trained six chimpanzees at Leipzig Zoo to use a touchscreen and play a video game in which they had to navigate to a tree to find a piece of fruit. When they did this, they were rewarded with a real fruit. The chimpanzees were given 10 minutes at a time with the game until they learned how to move in the virtual environment. The primates could refuse to take part at any time and all had used touchscreens previously. None of the animals were harmed in the study, Allritz says.

Testing chimpanzees in virtual environments could give researchers a better idea about why they prefer certain routes in the wild over others. “Knowing what kind of travel routes chimpanzees typically decide can help us develop computer simulations that can estimate the shape and size of home ranges that need to be protected,” Allritz says.

In the first experiment, the chimpanzees tried multiple times to find the same tree from the same starting point. In the second experiment, they started from a different position in the virtual environment. The team wanted to see if the animals could still navigate to the tree in order to collect the virtual fruit.

With practice, all six chimps could complete both tasks. But only three improved the efficiency of their routes with practice in the first task. “There could be many reasons for this,” Allritz says. “Some chimpanzees may have been better at recognising the landmark or they may simply have been less clumsy in using the touchscreen controls.”

Allritz says the study was ultimately about proving that chimpanzees could interact with a virtual environment that looked like a real-world setting. “The chimpanzees could have just walked around in circles,” he says.

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Jill Pruetz at the University of Texas says such experiments let us study chimpanzees in a way that can’t be done in the wild. “So in general I think that captive primate work is very worthwhile,” she says.

Journal reference: Science Advances, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abm4754

More on these topics:

  • animals
  • animal cognition

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