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‘Becoming Elizabeth’ Review: A Bold New Era for Starz’s Tudor Dramas

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‘Becoming Elizabeth’ Review: A Bold New Era for Starz’s Tudor Dramas

Is there really anything more TV can say about the Tudors? The 16th century British royals have inspired elegant installments of Masterpiece Theatre, a tawdry Showtime soap, and all sorts of adaptations of Philippa Gregory’s best-selling, female-centric historical novels. For nearly a decade, Gregory’s books have served as the backbone of Starz’s historical romance slate: The White Queen, The White Princess, and two seasons of The Spanish Princess traced the line of succession from Elizabeth Woodville’s reign at the height of the War of the Roses to Catherine Aragon’s marriage to a young Henry VIII.

Now Starz is shifting gears, but not order of succession, with Becoming Elizabeth. The tagline for the series is “The Queen You Know. The Girl You Don’t.” Hardcore Tudor nuts, like yours truly, may disagree with the sentiment because we like to think we already know it all. Nevertheless, Starz’s latest female-focused costume drama does excel at showing audiences that the formidable Queen Elizabeth was not the only extraordinary woman vying for power. The best part of Becoming Elizabeth might not be what it tells us about the legendary ruler, but how it lets the complex women in her orbit shine.

Becoming Elizabeth was created by playwright and TV writer Anya Reiss. The series therefore marks a major stylistic break from the likes of showrunner Emma Frost‘s past Philippa Gregory adaptations. While those earlier series built their complex court dramas around core romances, Becoming Elizabeth’s early Season 1 episodes orbit around the abusive relationship between the underage Elizabeth (Alicia von Rittberg) and her older, charming guardian Thomas Seymour (Tom Cullen). The headstrong and intelligent Elizabeth might think she’s embarking on a consensual flirtation, but that’s because she is still too young and sheltered to see the larger picture. It’s a disturbing seduction to watch, not least because Thomas Seymour had infamously eloped with Elizabeth’s stepmother, the last wife of Henry VIII, Catherine Parr (Jessica Raine). In the power vacuum of Henry’s death, Thomas’s intentions seem suspicious, to say the least.

Mary Tudor (Romola Garai) embracing Elizabeth (Alicia von Rittberg) in Becoming Elizabeth
Photo: Starz

Even though Becoming Elizabeth technically follows The White Queen, White Princess, and Spanish Princess in neat generational succession, it’s hard to mistake Reiss’s approach to Tudor history for Frost’s. Those past shows presented the English court as a place of opulence, the shows’ heroines were medieval girlbosses using their wits and wiles to narrowly survive a grim fate. Becoming Elizabeth turns this same setting into a horror movie. The show takes advantage of low ceilings and shadow, putting the characters in the dark, both figuratively and literally. Elizabeth and the other women don’t strut through the court, but seem constantly cornered.

As mentioned, Elizabeth isn’t the only character trying to navigate this dangerous court. Catherine Parr is refreshingly depicted as she was, a savvy politician and brilliant woman. Her Achilles’ heel is her love for the unpredictable Thomas Seymour, whom she hastily marries. This puts her at odds with other players in court, and even her beloved stepdaughter Elizabeth.

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Likewise, Elizabeth’s older half-sister Mary Tudor (Romola Garai) is gifted a far more nuanced (and historically accurate) portrait than other adaptations of Elizabeth’s life have granted. Mary cares about her sister, but understands that any sign of weakness — even the love of a sibling — could lead her to her own death. Mary is torn in three directions: between loyalties to her family, faith in the Catholic church, and her own political ambitions. It’s a refreshing take on a character usually only shown at the end of her disastrous reign, dying of probable uterine cancer and saddled with the horrific nickname of “Bloody Mary.”

Jessica Raine as Catherine Parr in Becoming Elizabeth
Photo: Starz

Becoming Elizabeth may not be every Tudor fan’s cup of tea. The subject matter is dark and the show doesn’t take pains to make any part of drama seem escapist or aspirational. The scripts aren’t as didactic as historical drama fans might be used to and (ironically, given the show’s tag line) folks who haven’t cracked open an Antonia Fraser tome might be a little lost. But I personally found it exciting to watch a show that clearly went to the source materials first and not a paperback novel.

Moreover, the acting in Becoming Elizabeth is spectacular. Alicia von Rittberg is picture perfect as the teen Elizabeth, from her copper hair to clear-eyed intelligence. But what’s more impressive is how the German actress is able to balance glimpses of the titan Elizabeth will become with the reality that she’s still a lonely, confused adolescent. Tom Cullen  is shockingly able to make Thomas Seymour into a three-dimensional character. You understand the pull he has on the women of the court, but you always also see his dark side. Romola Garai is fabulous as always, and Jessica Raine imbues Catherine Parr with bite. However, the scene-stealer of the cast has to be Game of Thrones alum Bella Ramsey, who takes the usually infantilized Lady Jane Grey and makes her a worthy rival to Elizabeth.

The first four episodes of Becoming Elizabeth establish the foundation for what could be the next era of Starz’s historical dramas. This show is darker, more disturbing, and more mature than what we’ve seen before. But it remains to be seen if Becoming Elizabeth, like its leading lady herself, can evolve past the Thomas Seymour drama.

Becoming Elizabeth premieres on June 12 on Starz.

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Gerrit Cole’s strong outing wasted in Yankees’ no-no loss

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Gerrit Cole’s strong outing wasted in Yankees’ no-no loss

This wasn’t what Gerrit Cole had in mind earlier in the week when he laughed at how being on the mound for a no-hitter has eluded him.

Cole spun a gem of a start Saturday, but wound up on the losing end because he shared the rubber with three Astros pitchers who combined on a no-hitter in a 3-0 victory over the Yankees. In a reminder of how cruel baseball can be, Cole twice took no-hitters into the middle of the game or beyond this week and wound up with a no-decision and a loss on his record (6-2).

“The cold hard truth is we got outpitched and outplayed,” Cole said. “Credit to the opponent. Magical day for them.”

Cole lost a no-hitter in the eighth inning Monday against the Rays, but the Yankees still won, which created a light moment when he joked he has never completed the job despite building a résumé with four All-Star selections and an ERA title. There was no such luck or levity Saturday when he would needed perfection — or better — to outduel Astros starter Cristian Javier and two relievers.

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Instead, Cole settled for striking out eight and scattering four hits over seven innings.

Gerrit Cole
Gerrit Cole
Robert Sabo

“Gerrit’s just going to keep doing that,” catcher Jose Trevino said. “That’s good for us in the long run.”

Cole walked two, but did not allow a hit until back-to-back, two-out singles by Jake Meyers and Martin Maldonado in the fifth inning. He survived that jam unharmed, but his 101st pitch was his big mistake in the seventh inning of a scoreless game.

J.J. Matijevic turned on a low-inside fastball and deposited it into the right-field seats for a homer as his reward for showing patience laying off a first pitch in the dirt. The rookie first baseman’s only two career hits have been solo home runs.

“I tried to make an adjustment and I obviously overcorrected and threw the pitch into an area that he was anticipating or he wasn’t going to be late on,” Cole said. “Not the side of the plate that we were trying to go to. It was honestly just a bad miss, but I don’t want to take any credit away from the guy who put a good swing on it.”

The solace is that Cole is pitching like an ace. He has allowed one run or fewer in five of his last six starts. Matijevic’s home run snapped Cole’s 21-inning scoreless streak at home.

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“Right away he was getting swing-and miss-with his heater, which was big while he was finding it those first two innings,” manager Aaron Boone said. “I thought his stuff was really good. Once he settled in, he was terrific.”

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4 wounded, including 8-year-old, in Brooklyn scooter shooting

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4 wounded, including 8-year-old, in Brooklyn scooter shooting

Four people were wounded — including an 8-year-old boy — in a scooter shooting in Brooklyn on Saturday night, police said.

Two men riding on a scooter pulled up around 11:30 p.m. to a large gathering of people in front of the Stuyvesant Gardens Houses on Quincy Street in Bedford-Stuyvesant and opened fire into the crowd, cops said.

An 8-year-old boy received a graze wound in the leg. A 27-year-old male, a 35-year-old female and a 46-year-old female were also each shot in the legs.

All four victims were transported to Kings County Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, police said.

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The suspects fled on a green and white scooter in an unknown direction, according to police and sources.

Six shell casings and two live rounds were recovered at the scene, sources said.

The victims are all expected to survive.
The victims are all expected to survive.
Paul Martinka

No arrests have been made at this time as police continued to canvas the area early Sunday morning.

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Man arrested for attempted murder of LAPD officers amid Roe v. Wade protests

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Man arrested for attempted murder of LAPD officers amid Roe v. Wade protests

Police holding rubber-bullet guns and batons move to disperse a crowd of abortion rights activists protesting after the overturning of Roe Vs. Wade by the US Supreme Court, in Downtown Los Angeles, on June 24, 2022.
Police holding rubber-bullet guns and batons move to disperse a crowd of abortion rights activists protesting after the overturning of Roe Vs. Wade by the US Supreme Court, in Downtown Los Angeles, on June 24, 2022.
Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

A man was charged with attempted murder of Los Angeles police officers Friday night amid protests of the Roe v. Wade reversal, cops said.

A woman was also charged with resisting police after four officers were injured following a barrage of projectiles, fireworks and a makeshift blow torch, according to officials.

The mayhem unfolded around 8:20 p.m. in Downtown Los Angeles, the LAPD said.

Michael Ortiz, 30, is accused of throwing a makeshift flame thrower at an officer, who was treated for burns, according to a Saturday press release.

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Juliana Bernado, 23, allegedly attempted to steal an officer’s baton. A “less-lethal” bullet was fired at her, and she was taken into custody, police said.

“I condemn the violence against officers that occurred last night and into today,” Chief Michel Moore said.

“Individuals participating in such criminal activity are not exercising their 1st Amendment rights in protest of the Supreme Court decision, rather, they are acting as criminals.  

The Department will vigorously pursue prosecution of these individuals.”

Large scale protests in other cities large and small around the country were mostly peaceful.

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