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Asics Gel Nimbus 24 review

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Asics Gel Nimbus 24 review

The Asics Gel Nimbus 24 is a versatile shoe for running. If you’re looking to conquer your first 5k, train for longer distances or just have fun with running, this trainer offers comfort, cushioning and support.

For

  • + Comfortable midsole
  • + A good all-rounder
  • + Breathable-and-flexible upper

Against

  • Grip could be better
  • Lighter options available

If you’re a fan of the Asics Gel Nimbus shoe then you’re going to want to hear how the updated version measures up. The Asics Gel Nimbus 24 has undergone a few changes, including a new upper, midsole, and outsole making the shoe a stable, supportive and comfortable shoe to wear while racking up the miles.

Its new Trusstic technology (under the foot arch) prevents the foot from twisting as you step, which is good news for overpronators. The shoe also features a new FF Blast+ foam in the midsole making it a more-responsive ride which we took advantage of on our longer runs during testing.

The Gel Nimbus 24 weighs in at 10.2oz (290g), this is 0.7oz (20g) lighter than its predecessor the Nimbus 23. This helps your runs feel effortless but it’s only fair to point out that there are lighter distance shoes on the market. 

However, the thing we most enjoyed about this shoe is its versatility. While it may not look as exciting as some of the stylish and bolder running shoe designs, it delivered consistently, whatever the run or terrain.

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How we tested

To give the Gel Nimbus 24 a good run, we tested them out across four different runs and routes. Our first was a 5K on a typical city pavement. The middle two runs ranged between 5k and 10K and involved a mix of pavement and trail, and the final run was a longer, recovery run around a large grassy park. 

We found the shoe responsive and enjoyable to run in for short, middle, and long distances. We were predominantly city-based while testing the Nimbus 24s and can confirm it responds well on these surfaces. Despite feeling the odd slip under the feet on wetter areas of concrete we experienced no issues. Though we had less trail experimentation, we can’t see why this shoe wouldn’t be well-suited to a mixture of outdoor terrains.

Build and cushioning

Asics Gel Nimbus 24

(Image credit: Future)

We tested the women’s Asics Gel Nimbus 24, which has a 13mm drop, while the men’s has a 10mm drop. This is a high drop but anyone who lands heel first when they run will benefit from this most. We liked this higher drop as it contributed to a softer landing and helped with creating a good level of motion while running.

One of the more notable changes applied to the Nimbus 24 is the new FF Blast+ midsole foam. The Japanese shoe company claims this technology should make the shoe 15% lighter, 15% softer, and 12% bouncier than the already bouncy FF Blast Foam used for the Novablast 2s. For us, this new midsole gave the shoe flexibility and it had a lot of energy to offer. We felt like we could run fast when we wanted to and nothing held this back.

If you prefer a running shoe with less structure to it then you may not fall head over heels by the feel of the Nimbus 24. The new Trusstic tech sits nicely under the foot arch. This is a feature usually put in place for overpronators. However, the 24s are a neutral shoe and we’d agree with this. We think it’s a solid in-between shoe for runners who like extra support but don’t want to feel tied to buying a shoe just for stability.

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Design and upper

Asics Gel Nimbus 24

(Image credit: Future)

In its design, the shoe has no stand-out features, though it is a good-looking trainer. We tested the navy and pink versions, which were hard to pair with certain colors of running leggings but this is us being nitpicky.

We found the Nimbus 24 to fit true-to-size, but if for any reason you are worried about room, the engineered mesh upper not only adds comfort but it’s nice and stretchy.

The Nimbus 24 has had a revamp to its tongue. Feeling less plush for us during testing, the new tongue is thinner and lacking some padding. On the first run, we didn’t like the thin feel to it but it grew on us. The gusseted stretch knit tongue provides support and breathability. The slimmer design features flexible midfoot panels that offer better support and will be suitable for heel-strikers.

Outsole

Asics Gel Nimbus 24

(Image credit: Future)

The bottom of the shoe consists of segmented Asics Lite rubber, and during our testing we got a good level of stability and durability from the outsole without sacrificing the shoe’s flexibility. However, there were two instances where the grip could have felt stronger while running at speed over wetter surfaces, especially running over soggy leaves that can be slippy.

For some, the outsole may feel like it has a thin layer of rubber for a daily running shoe, but we didn’t notice any quick wearing of the outsole or have issues with it. Although some areas of the outsole are more exposed, the Nimbus 24 features high-abrasion rubber in the rear and forefront of the trainer. We think the placement of extra durable rubber here should set this shoe up to be a long-serving pair of running shoes.

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Performance

Asics Gel Nimbus 24

(Image credit: Future)

The Nimbus 24 is lighter than the Nimbus 23 and we felt the lightness shine through as we clocked up the miles in them. You receive a fun level of bounce with the Nimbus 24, but it unfortunately doesn’t have that rocker and forward-roll feel to it that can help when you want to go faster. A greater forward-roll feel to the trainer would also offer a more-pronounced toe-off.

We found the Nimbus 24 fitted true to size and the spacious toe box means the shoe can accommodate thicker socks in winter. The stretchiness of the front foot area pairs nicely with some light compression, which we found good at locking down the forefoot while running. It’s a bonus when a running shoe not only fits well but also when it offers generous padding and cushioning. We liked the feel and comfort of the Nimbus 24 so much that we ended up using the shoe for daily wearing and to the gym.

Verdict

The Asics Gel Nimbus 24 is a great daily trainer and one that experienced and beginner runners will have fun training in. It’s a light, cushioned and durable running shoe offering lots of comfortable mileage. If you want a shoe you can wear for faster-paced runs and longer, easier recovery runs then the Nimbus 24 is a great shout. The gusset tongue makes for a nice roomy fit and greater comfort while running. Despite the shoe lacking any form of rocker effect, it will endure through plenty of distance. Plus, any overpronators looking for a suitable running shoe can make the most of the new Trusstic tech, which helps the feet from twisting during a run.

Alternatives

The Asics Gel Nimbus 24 lacks any form of rocker and if this is a preference of yours, you may be better-suited to a Hoka running shoe. 

The Hoka Mach 4 features a rockered sole to create that heel-to-toe roll, it’s about 2oz lighter than the Nimbus 24 and nice and cushioned for longer miles. Or if you’re looking to spend less on a daily training shoe but still find a pair that can endure longer runs, there’s the Brooks Trace running shoe. This is another lightweight option, suitable for mixed terrains and doesn’t exceed the $100 mark.

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Jessica Downey

Jessica is a Staff Writer at our sister site Fit&Well. Her love for keeping fit and fueling her body with healthy and enjoyable food led her to write about all things fitness and health-related. If she isn’t out testing the latest fitness products such as the latest running shoe or yoga mat then she can be found on the Fit&Well news desk writing news and features on the best ways to build strength, active aging, female health, and anything in between. Before then she had a small stint writing in local news, has also written for Runners World UK (print and digital), and gained experience with global content marketing agency, Cedar Communications.

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Science

Global Warming Causes Fewer Tropical Cyclones

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Global Warming Causes Fewer Tropical Cyclones

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But having fewer hurricanes and typhoons does not make them less of a threat. Those that do manage to form are more likely to reach higher intensities as the world continues to heat up with the burning of fossil fuels.


Scientists have been trying for decades to answer the question of how climate change will affect tropical cyclones, given the large-scale death and destruction these storms can cause. Climate models have suggested the number of storms should decline as global temperatures rise, but that had not been confirmed in the historical record. Detailed tropical cyclone data from satellites only go back until about the 1970s, which is not long enough to pick out trends driven by global warming.


The new study worked around those limitations by using what is called a reanalysis: the highest-quality available observations are fed into a weather computer model. “That’s something which gets us close to what the observation would have looked like,” essentially “filling in the gaps,” says study co-author Savin Chand, an atmospheric scientist at Federation University Australia. This gives researchers a reasonably realistic picture of the atmosphere over time, in this case going back to 1850. Chand and his team developed an algorithm that could pick out tropical cyclones in that reanalysis data set, enabling them to look for trends over a 162-year period.

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They found the 13 percent global decrease in tropical cyclones over the period of 1900 to 2012, compared with 1850 to 1900 (the latter is widely considered a pre-global-warming reference period). There was an even larger decline of about 23 percent since around 1950, around the time global temperatures started to noticeably rise. The declines vary in different parts of the ocean. For example, the western North Pacific saw 9 percent fewer storms, and the eastern North Pacific saw 18 percent fewer over the 20th and early 21st centuries. And the North Atlantic results indicated a peculiar trend, showing an overall decrease over the past century—but with an uptick in recent decades. That shorter-term increase could be linked to natural climate variations, better detection of storms or a decrease in aerosol pollution (because aerosols have a cooling effect, and tropical cyclones thrive on warm waters).


The study provides crucial ground-truth information for evaluating climate model projections of further future changes in cyclone frequency, says Kimberly Wood, a tropical meteorologist at Mississippi State University, who was not involved with the paper.


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Chand and his colleagues link the decrease in tropical storm frequency to changes in atmospheric conditions that constrict convection—the process where warm, moist air surges upward in the atmosphere, which allows tropical cyclones to develop from small weather disturbances that act as the “seeds.” The researchers think those changes are caused by warming-driven shifts in global atmospheric circulation patterns. “It’s a pretty holistic view,” Wood says of the analysis.


But even if there are fewer tropical cyclones overall, a larger proportion of those that do form are expected to reach higher intensities because global warming is also raising sea-surface temperatures and making the atmosphere warmer and moister—the conditions these storms thrive on. “Once a tropical cyclone forms,” Chand says, “there is a lot of fuel in the atmosphere.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

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    Andrea Thompson, an associate editor at Scientific American, covers sustainability. Follow her on Twitter @AndreaTWeather Credit: Nick Higgins

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    Science

    The effect of breast cancer screening is declining

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    The effect of breast cancer screening is declining

    Screening for breast cancer has a cost. This is shown by a Danish/Norwegian study that analysed 10,580 breast cancer deaths among Norwegian women aged 50 to 75 years.

    “The beneficial effect of screening is currently declining because the treatment of cancer is improving. Over the last 25 years, the mortality rate for breast cancer has been virtually halved,” says Henrik Støvring, who is behind the study.

    According to the researcher, the problem is that screenings lead to both overdiagnosis and overtreatment, which has a cost both on a human level and in terms of the economy.

    Overdiagnosis and overtreatment

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    When the screening was introduced, the assessment was that around twenty per cent of the deaths from breast cancer among those screened could be averted. While this corresponded to approximately 220 deaths a year in Denmark 25 years ago, today the number has been halved.

    The study shows that in 1996 it was necessary to invite 731 women to avoid a single breast cancer death in Norway, you would have to invite at least 1364 and probably closer to 3500 to achieve the same result in 2016.

    On the other hand, the adverse effects of screening are unchanged.

    “One in five women aged 50-70, who is told they have breast cancer, has received a ‘superfluous’ diagnosis because of screening — without screening, they would never have noticed or felt that they had breast cancer during their lifetime,” says the researcher.

    One in five corresponds to 900 women annually in Denmark. In addition, every year more than 5000 women are told that the screening has given rise to suspicion of breast cancer — a suspicion that later turns out to be incorrect.

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    Peaceful, small nodes — but in who?

    Henrik Støvring notes that the result is not beneficial for the screening programmes. According to him, the Norwegian results can also be transferred to Denmark. Here, women between 50 and 69 are offered a mammogram screening every second year. This is an X-ray examination of the breast, which can show whether the woman has cellular changes that could be breast cancer.

    The Danish screening programme became a national programme offered to all woman in the age group in 2007 — three years after the Norwegians. Approx. 300,000 Danish women are invited to screening for breast cancer every year.

    According to the researcher, the challenge is that we are not currently able to tell the difference between the small cancer tumours that will kill you and those that will not. Some of these small nodes are so peaceful or slow-growing that the woman would die a natural death with undetected breast cancer, if she had not been screened. But once a cancer node has been discovered, it must of course be treated, even though this was not necessary for some of the women — we just do not know who.

    “The women who are invited to screening live longer because all breast cancer patients live longer, and because we have got better drugs, more effective chemotherapy, and because we now have cancer care pathways, which mean the healthcare system reacts faster than it did a decade ago,” says Henrik Støvring.

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    Story Source:

    Materials provided by Aarhus University. Original written by Helle Horskjær Hansen. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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    Thin-film photovoltaic technology combines efficiency and versatility

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    Thin-film photovoltaic technology combines efficiency and versatility

    Stacking solar cells increases their efficiency. Working with partners in the EU-funded PERCISTAND project, researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have produced perovskite/CIS tandem solar cells with an efficiency of nearly 25percent- the highest value achieved thus far with this technology. Moreover, this combination of materials is light and versatile, making it possible to envision the use of these tandem solar cells in vehicles, portable equipment, and devices that can be folded or rolled up. The researchers present their results in the journal ACS Energy Letters.

    Perovskite solar cells have made astounding progress over the past decade. Their efficiency is now comparable to that of the long-established silicon solar cells. Perovskites are innovative materials with a special crystal structure. Researchers worldwide are working to get perovskite photovoltaic technology ready for practical applications. The more electricity they generate per unit of surface area, the more attractive solar cells are for consumers

    The efficiency of solar cells can be increased by stacking two or more cells. If each of the stacked solar cells is especially efficient at absorbing light from a different part of the solar spectrum, inherent losses can be reduced and efficiency boosted. The efficiency is a measure of how much of the incident light is converted into electricity. Thanks to their versatility, perovskite solar cells make outstanding components for such tandems. Tandem solar cells using perovskites and silicon have reached a record efficiency level of over 29percent, considerably higher than that of individual cells made of perovskite (25.7percent) or silicon (26.7percent).

    Combining Perovskites with CIS for Mobility and Flexibility

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    Combining perovskites with other materials such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) or copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) promises further benefits. Such combinations will make it possible to produce light and flexible tandem solar cells that can be installed not only on buildings but also on vehicles and portable equipment. Such solar cells could even be folded or rolled up for storage and extended when needed, for example on blinds or awnings to provide shade and generate electricity at the same time.

    An international team of researchers headed by Dr. Marco A. Ruiz-Preciado and tenure-track professor Ulrich W. Paetzold from the Light Technology Institute (LTI) and the Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT) at KIT has succeeded in producing perovskite/CIS tandem solar cells with a maximum efficiency of 24.9percent (23.5percent certified). “This is the highest reported efficiency for this technology and the first high efficiency level reached at all with a nearly gallium-free copper-indium diselenide solar cell in a tandem,” says Ruiz-Preciado. Reducing the amount of gallium results in a narrow band gap of approximately one electron volt (eV), which is very close to the ideal value of 0.96eV for the lower solar cell in a tandem.

    CIS Solar Cells with Narrow Band Gap- Perovskite Solar Cells with Low Bromine Content

    The band gap is a material characteristic that determines the part of the solar spectrum that a solar cell can absorb to generate electricity. In a monolithic tandem solar cell, the band gaps must be such that the two cells can produce similar currents to achieve maximum efficiency. If the lower cell’s band gap changes, the upper cell’s band gap has to be adjusted to the change, and vice versa.

    To adjust the band gap for efficient tandem integration, perovskites with high bromine content are usually used. However, this often leads to voltage drops and phase instability. Since the KIT researchers and their partners use CIS solar cells with a narrow band gap at the base of their tandems, they can produce their upper cells using perovskites with low bromine content, which results in cells that are more stable and efficient.

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    “Our study demonstrates the potential of perovskite/CIS tandem solar cells and establishes the foundation for future development to make further improvements in their efficiency,” says Paetzold. “We’ve reached this milestone thanks to the outstanding cooperation in the EU’s PERCISTAND project and, in particular, thanks to our close cooperation with the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research.” Important groundwork was done in the CAPITANO project funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action (BMWK).

    Story Source:

    Materials provided by Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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