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Anish Kapoor’s Media Art Unveiled on LG SIGNATURE OLED R in Basel

Stunning Self-Lit Picture Quality of LG’s Unique, Rollable OLED Brought Renowned Artist’s Exciting, New Work to Life at World’s Leading International Art Fair SEOUL – WEBWIRE – Monday, June 20, 2022 LG Electronics (LG) collaborated with Anish Kapoor1 to showcase the world-renowned British-Indian artist’s media artwork on LG SIGNATURE OLED R. Representing the perfect fusion of…

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Anish Kapoor’s Media Art Unveiled on LG SIGNATURE OLED R in Basel

Stunning Self-Lit Picture Quality of LG’s Unique, Rollable OLED Brought Renowned Artist’s Exciting, New Work to Life at World’s Leading International Art Fair


SEOUL – WEBWIRE



LG Electronics (LG) collaborated with Anish Kapoor1 to showcase the world-renowned British-Indian artist’s media artwork on LG SIGNATURE OLED R. Representing the perfect fusion of artistry and technology, Kapoor’s experiential digital art on LG’s sublime, self-lit TV was presented in collaboration with LISSON GALLERY in Basel, Switzerland during Art Basel 2022 from June 16-19.

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With superior picture quality enabled by millions of self-lit pixels, LG OLED TV has become a favorite with the creative industries and innovative artistic practitioners worldwide. Its ability to capture the essence of the artist’s vision through vibrant, accurate color reproduction, complete with deep blacks and infinite contrast, make LG OLED2 the ultimate digital canvas. Add in the unique form factor of LG SIGNATURE OLED R, which pairs a rollable screen – an innovation made possible by LG OLED technology – with a timeless, minimalist design, and the stage is set for the most memorable art and viewing experiences imaginable.


One of the most important artists working today, Anish Kapoor is a sculptor known for his distinctive and often impressively-scaled installations, such as Cloud Gate (2004) in Chicago’s Millennium Park and Sky Mirror (2006) in New York’s Rockefeller Center. Noted for his use of abstract forms, rich colors and reflective surfaces, the artist has turned his attention to the two-dimensional in his unique collaboration with LG.


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Kapoor’s new work takes the form of a short film that continues his decades of combining shape with luxurious, saturated colors that constantly and subtly shift from one mesmerizing hue to another. The work was paired with a specially-commissioned soundtrack that adds to the experiential nature of the piece; complementing the visuals shown on LG SIGNATURE OLED R while drawing viewers into ‘the moment,’ and at times, creating a sense of disorientation.


LG previously partnered with Anish Kapoor for his major exhibition at the Accademia Gallery in Venice last April. During the event, LG OLED evo TV G series models were used to display images of Kapoor’s most well-known sculptures and installations, leveraging LG’s OLED evo technology to faithfully reproduce the colors and textures – and convey the three-dimensionality – of his physical works.


To celebrate the latest LG-Kapoor collaboration, 10 editions of the LG SIGNATURE OLED R Anish Kapoor Edition will be meeting art lovers around the world via LISSON GALLERY, one of the leading galleries, which has worked with the artist for forty years.

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LG continues to deliver enriching artworld experiences through hosting a series of exhibitions demonstrating the intrinsic link and undeniable harmony between art and technology. The digital artworks brought to life by LG OLED will be uploaded to the OLED Art project website after their real-world unveiling, allowing art enthusiasts and OLED fans around the world to enjoy them at their convenience.


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Anish Kapoor is considered to be one of the most influential artists working today. Born in Mumbai, India in 1954, he now lives and works in London. His works are permanently exhibited in the most important collections and museums around the world from the Museum of Modern Art in New York to the Tate in London; at the Prada Foundation in Milan; at the Guggenheim Museums in Venice, Bilbao and Abu Dhabi. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, Germany (2020); Central Academy of Fine Arts Museum and Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing (2019); Fundación Proa, Buenos Aires (2019);  Serralves, Museu de Arte Contemorânea, Porto, Portugal (2018); University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC), Mexico City (2016); Château de Versailles, France (2015); Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, Moscow (2015); Gropius Bau, Berlin (2013); Sakıp Sabancı Müzesi, Istanbul (2013); Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2012).


Anish Kapoor represented Great Britain at the 44th Venice Biennale in 1990 where he was awarded the Premio Duemila Prize. In 1991 he won the Turner Prize and has gone on to receive numerous international awards including the Praemium Imperiale in 2011 and Padma Bhushan in 2012. He received a CBE in 2003 and a Knighthood in 2013 for visual arts services.


Also renowned for his architecturally-scaled works, public projects include: Cloud Gate (2004), Millennium Park, Chicago, USA; Leviathan (2011) exhibited at 2011 Monumenta, Paris; Orbit (2012), Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London; Ark Nova, an inflatable concert hall created for Lucerne Festival, Japan (2013-) and Descension, (2014) most recently installed in Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York, USA (2017).


LG is committed to making life better through the power of art and technology. LG’s recent projects represent this commitment and celebrates the merging of technical essence and artistic creativity that has come to define LG and the unique value it continues to deliver.


LG OLED becomes a digital canvas for artists, with ‘self-lit’ being the core value of LG OLED. Through this technology, LG believes artists can express their imagination and create a new generation of digital art that were never before available. As a bridge that connects lifestyle with art, LG OLED will keep building a society where more people can relish art. To follow the journey of LG OLED ART, visit LGOLEDART.com.

( Press Release Image: https://photos.webwire.com/prmedia/6/290638/290638-1.jpg )

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Thom Browne Spring 2023 Menswear

In 2017, Thom Browne expanded his oeuvre and put men in dresses during his menswear show in Paris. That collection, called “Why Not?” was less a provocation than a flex: The elegant elongated shapes Browne was developing for women translated, seamlessly and cheekily, for men. Five years later—and after a two-year hiatus from Paris—Browne’s menswear…

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Thom Browne Spring 2023 Menswear

In 2017, Thom Browne expanded his oeuvre and put men in dresses during his menswear show in Paris. That collection, called “Why Not?” was less a provocation than a flex: The elegant elongated shapes Browne was developing for women translated, seamlessly and cheekily, for men. Five years later—and after a two-year hiatus from Paris—Browne’s menswear is back in the French capital with similar potency. His spring 2023 collection, suspended almost entirely from jock straps, is Browne’s updated meditation on “how far you can push it?”

“I thought the dresses were too much back then,” Browne began at a preview in his showroom, “but now feels like the time to do this. It’s about how much guys can look at and entertain.” Referring to the many visible cheeks on the catwalk, he pointedly added: “It’s not about shock value.”

If not shock, then what? There has been a lot of nudity this menswear season and in the past two years in general, but Browne’s stated intent is less about showing flesh than it is about finding a new form for men. You can see how he could get bored quick. This is his third catwalk in under a year—plus four pre-collections. “I have a good team” he demurred when asked how he creates with such voracity.

So the brief was brief this season: short, mini, kinky, gorgeous. Each of the looks was made in a unique French tweed, from the same maker of you-know-who’s tweeds, inspired by the couture ideology of the 1940s and 1950s. The show began with friends of the maison as couture clients—Anh Duong, Marisa Berenson, Farida Khelfa, and more—bolting in to the second floor of the Crillon to find their seats. From their vantage point they could ogle the guys—a nice swap—in their shorter-in-the-back kiltlets, sailor tops, cropped organza button downs, and luxurious tweed coats with gold bouillon. As with any Browne outing, the fabrics and silhouettes were as fine as can be.

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After a mostly underwhelming season, at least according to the menswear editors I tallied, how far could this irreverent beauty really go, though? Several balked. Others chuckled. When a dancer emerged at the end of the show dressed in a codpiece with an anchor Prince Albert piercing, I exchanged a glance with a friend across the aisle and we both giggled. Last night was Pride in Paris. In Browne’s beloved USA, human rights are being revoked by the hour. It would be hard to picture a more gay and proud couture-worthy collection: the sailor, the cowboy, the surfer, the tennis pro; the stereotypes divorced from expected connotations, made in the artisanal gold standard of womenswear design, ass cracks gleaming and pert under those red, white and blue bars of gingham. Browne is gay and proud. Will his cis-het clientele be radicalized or scandalized? A voiceover that started the show spoke about the couture process of the ’50s, when women were swans and men were their benefactors. “Men have the very great pleasure of paying,” said the recording. Time to pay up, boys.

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Ambush Resort 2023

“The touchpoint and the root of every Ambush collection has to come from everything that happens in Japan that is unique,” said Yoon Ahn when we met at the very beginning of Paris Fashion Week. Given that she has been on that scene since the early 2000s, when she moved to Tokyo with her family,…

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Ambush Resort 2023

“The touchpoint and the root of every Ambush collection has to come from everything that happens in Japan that is unique,” said Yoon Ahn when we met at the very beginning of Paris Fashion Week. Given that she has been on that scene since the early 2000s, when she moved to Tokyo with her family, not to mention that the Ambush office sits right in Shibuya, Yoon has plenty of material to mine. This pre-collection represented a down-tempo interlude in Ambush’s rhythm of show season spectacular, and was more observationaL. The collection was designed as an imagined curation of the clothes she sees on the kids who are flocking back to Shibuya today. “Things are opening up, the clubs: everything’s coming back in Tokyo. I’ve been feeling that.”

Tailoring, sportswear, footwear, nylon-spliced denim, and of course this brand’s core category of jewelry was all effectively designed to be defined less by the wearer’s gender identity than their aesthetic orientation and subcultural proclivity. The classics covered, from Ambush specific bodice tops and kimono coats to standards including bowling shirts and tracksuits, were adroitly but subtly remixed through tweaks in proportion, color, and fabrication. Pills and mushrooms came suspended from safety pin earrings and chains, supplies brought in for a big night ahead. This though was a collection built for street life: night life comes later.

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Alled-Martinez Spring 2023 Menswear

“I don’t really like the term ‘Y2K,’” quipped Archie Alled-Martinez during a Zoom preview from his hotel in Paris. “We just used to call it ‘millennium’ back then, so that’s what it is for me.”Alled-Martinez is part of a wave of millennial designers that is remarkably skilled at putting together a visual mood that encapsulates…

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Alled-Martinez Spring 2023 Menswear

“I don’t really like the term ‘Y2K,’” quipped Archie Alled-Martinez during a Zoom preview from his hotel in Paris. “We just used to call it ‘millennium’ back then, so that’s what it is for me.”

Alled-Martinez is part of a wave of millennial designers that is remarkably skilled at putting together a visual mood that encapsulates an era or mood. “I do a ton of research,” he said “I like exhaustive research of images and visuals, it’s what helps me design.” Much of the research he did for spring was based on the mystique around the soccer player. Titled “Reclaiming the Fields,” the collection is a nod to the homoeroticism of that figure and a reclaiming of the word and concept of a “metrosexual.” “I kept reading that word as I researched and I thought, ‘How homophobic?’ Alled-Martinez said as he pulled up the Google definition of the word: “a young, urban, heterosexual male with liberal political views, an interest in fashion, and a refined sense of taste.”

The fact is, around the time both Alled-Martinez and myself were growing up, the word was casually thrown around as a descriptor of a straight man who embodied all the stereotypical characteristics of a gay man without (allegedly) being one. In essence it was a way for people to pejoratively call someone gay without actually doing so. Many of the “metrosexuals” of our time were famous athletes, particularly soccer players, who dressed well and looked even better—David Beckham being the best example. In fact, Beckham was a source of inspiration for Alled-Martinez, which explains why the lookbook resembles a series of photos of Beckham in the late noughties, the clothes looking like just what he would have worn for a night out with or without Victoria Beckham.

The collection itself stays true to the signature homoerotic aesthetic that Alled-Martinez has become known for, particularly to the gay fashion community and social media space. Part of the charm of the label is that its founder knows just how to speak to his audience. “There’s an intrinsic nostalgia to my work, I like to recreate things that are constantly in my mind,” Alled-Martinez said as he walked me through the lineup for spring. Low-rise cargo pants, straight-cut jeans, knee-length swim trunks, and tight short shorts build the core of the assortment, all cut and styled in his signature gay male gaze, which is homoerotic and often voyeuristic. They’re all references to the way men would dress back in the second half of the 2000’s, and, most significantly, to those elements of masculinity that gay men coming into their queerness at the time would often lust for.

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“I like doing the tees because it reminds me of when I was growing up and would see a Ford logo tee that said ‘fuck’ instead,” Alled-Martinez said. This season’s tees with Ford and Bic logos reimagined as “faggot” and “dick,” respectively, will surely be a hit for his nostalgic customer, but the designer was at his best this season when he took it past the mood board and found a way of turning nostalgic items into covetable pieces. A pair of baggy cargos in light wash denim stood out, with the center-front crotch seam mimicking a jockstrap, as did macrame bags made in raw silk and “cheap poly football uniforms” reimagined in glossy, saturated colored knitted silk.

For his presentation, Allied-Martinez decided to lean into the voyeuristic sensuality of his brand, creating an installation that saw guests peep into the collection through holes in a wooden wall to discover a locker room where models were changing in and out of the clothes. “Basically an ode to voyeurism and glory holes, all about desire,” said the designer. It was something that felt right out of XY magazine, another Y2K–sorry, I mean millennium–gem many millennial gay men will surely remember.

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