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8 Celebrity Fathers Who Share How Happy They Are to Have a Family

When you have difficulties in believing in a happy family life, there is a lot of proof among celebrities that can change your mind. Of course, it’s not easy, but the main thing is you need to put in the work when it comes to your relationship, and then you get the most precious time.We at Bright Side are inspired by some celebrities who’ve managed to build strong family ties and…

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8 Celebrity Fathers Who Share How Happy They Are to Have a Family

When you have difficulties in believing in a happy family life, there is a lot of proof among celebrities that can change your mind. Of course, it’s not easy, but the main thing is you need to put in the work when it comes to your relationship, and then you get the most precious time.

We at Bright Side are inspired by some celebrities who’ve managed to build strong family ties and share what they say about their better halves.

1. Ryan Reynolds

Ryan Reynold and Blake Lively are a good example of a Hollywood family. Together they have 3 daughters and Ryan shares how he actually feels about it: “It’s a dream. They’re the best. They’re my buddies. I love it.”

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Blake plays a huge role in his life, and heartfelt posts on Instagram prove it: “You’re the heart and soul of every moment this family shares. I’m grateful for the light and for the kindness you smuggle into each and every second of our lives. I see you in the eyes of our children.”

2. Chris Hemsworth

Chris Hemsworth is not just a successful actor, but he is a brilliant father and husband. He is not afraid to say that everything he has is thanks to his wife, Elsa Pataky: “My wife definitely put aside her career. She had done, like 20 films in Europe in French, Spanish, and then we had kids, and she said, ’This is your bit, do it, and I’m here for you, supporting.’” And Chris is very thankful for that.

3. Prince William

Prince William opened up, saying that “having children is the biggest life-changing moment, but it’s also one of the scariest.” He doesn’t deny that it can be hard to have a family, but his wife is always there for him: “Me and Catherine particularly, we support each other, and we go through those moments together and we kind of evolve and learn together.”

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Once, Prince William said to the public: “[Kate] has the coldest hands ever. But as they say, ’Cold hands, warm heart.’” Although it’s a joke, there’s so much warmth in his words.

4. Jimmy Fallon

Jimmy Fallon and Nancy Juvonen married in 2007 and have had 2 kids via a surrogate. Being a father for Jimmy is “the most exciting, amazing thing.” He says that his life has never been this cool.

Nancy is that person who made it happen: “I’d be nothing without my wife. She’s the coolest. She’s the greatest. She is the smartest. She’s the funniest. I love her so much. She’s like the — it’s like your best friend for the rest of your life.”

Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness have been married for decades. The actor says: “When I met Deb, it was 10 times better than my single life. And she had confidence in herself. I had a massive crush on her instantly.”

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Hugh and Deborra have 2 children and both were adopted shortly after birth: “Sure there are challenges, but everyone’s in the right place with the right people. It sounds airy-fairy, but it’s something we feel very deeply.”

6. John Krasinski

John Krasinski is very much in love with his wife Emily Blunt: “For me, the best days of my life started when I met my wife — that’s the truth, it’s not just me saying it because it sounds nice on a card. She’s one of the coolest people, she’s so talented, she’s beautiful, and she’s certainly out of my league.”

John shares that his wife is his hero. They have 2 daughters together.

7. Matthew McConaughey

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Here is one more actor who found peace and happiness in family life. Matthew McConaughey spends lots of time with his wife and children, and it looks like he adores it: “If you go deep in a rom-com, you can sink the ship. In my life, though, I was going very deep. I found the love of my life in Camila. We had a newborn coming. I had more things to get angry about, laugh about, have more joy about, and be sad about.”

8. Pierce Brosnan

Pierce Brosnan was married twice, but he found happiness again with American journalist Keely Shaye Smith. The couple has 2 sons together, Dylan and Paris.

They have been married for more than 20 years: “I had a great marriage which sadly had its own ending, and I was lucky enough to find love again. We were meant to find each other. I thank God for her every day.”

Do you believe in love for life? Would you prefer a family or the single life?

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25 Workers Opened Up About The “Seemingly Cool” Jobs That Are “Total Traps”

“He has cuts, burns, scrapes, and chronic foot problems.” We recently posted a list of “trap” careers that seem like they’d be amazing, but are totally awful in reality. People from the BuzzFeed Community flooded the comments with their own submissions. Here are 25 more careers that aren’t as great as they seem: 1. “Being…

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25 Workers Opened Up About The “Seemingly Cool” Jobs That Are “Total Traps”

“He has cuts, burns, scrapes, and chronic foot problems.”

We recently posted a list of “trap” careers that seem like they’d be amazing, but are totally awful in reality. People from the BuzzFeed Community flooded the comments with their own submissions. Here are 25 more careers that aren’t as great as they seem:

1.

“Being some kind of ‘influencer’ is never gonna be easy. It’s competitive AF, and you have to either work extremely hard to build a platform, or get lucky and go viral or something. Even then, it’ll still take a while for it to become a full-time job, let alone a well-paid one. A lot of people are quite vain and think if they can get on camera, or start a podcast, they’ll make it amongst the ocean of other people doing the exact same thing.”

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—aedanjslater

2.

“Audiologist. It requires a doctorate degree, but the pay is even less than a physical therapist.”

—msyingsun

3.

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“Professional touring musician. There’s a reason why most people who do it tap out by age 30. At a certain point, even the most enthusiastic ones get sick of driving long hours in a packed van, loading in and loading out rigs and equipment, and doing all of their shaving, showering, and shitting at all-night truck stops in the middle of nowhere. Not only that, all the time you spend on the road is time away from friends, family, and significant others, so be prepared to sacrifice a few relationships. Most people get sold on a romanticized version of the profession, but the reality is pretty grinding. There’s a lot of time and energy expended just to play an hour to hour-and-a-half set every night.”

—bbomb2112

4.

“I used to work in higher education in the administration side with student orgs, housing, clubs, etc. They require a two-year master’s degree for many entry level positions. Then they pay you under $32,000 and make you work insane hours (easily 50-60 a week). However, there is rarely room for advancement. We’re talking 100 people going for one opening. If you’re geographically locked, your options are limited. They’re also expected to travel to work conferences on their own dimes and travel to interview all over the country, and be willing to move. My position was cut, and I went to work at a call center for a major bank where I started at $45,000, which was $10,000 more than I was making in higher ed. In three years at the call center, I’m up to $60,000 and if I was still in higher ed, I might be in a role that pays $47,000.”

—allteam

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5.

“Restaurant manager. Especially salaried managers. These restaurants will have you working 60-80 hour work weeks because they’ve got you on lock with salary and don’t have to pay overtime. You’ll definitely be earning less money than your front of house staff, and oh my god, someone is always mad at you. If it’s not the guests, it’s the staff. If it’s not the staff, it’s upper management. Sometimes, it’s a fun little mashup of two of those, or even all three. Oh — and people will lie right to your face, and you can’t do anything about it.”

—jennj479d3c130

6.

“Being a professor at most places is not a good life. You will juggle 50 different things at once with new responsibilities added every semester for no extra pay. Add onto that the customer service relationship the administration will want you to have with students, and it all adds up to be nothing like it is shown to be on TV and in movies. The burnout factor is very high. Everyone I know is exhausted all the time.”

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—profplum

7.

“Working in television. Especially in Canada. It has few employers, long or odd hours, and low pay. If you meet anyone in this field over 40, they’re likely divorced.”

—aaronk462e2ee5f

8.

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“PR agencies. The owners/VPs get all the $$$ from clients’ retainers, while you do all the work. Doesn’t matter if your workload continues to increase — they won’t want to share the wealth/pay you more. You’re always on call for clients, and your job greatly depends on others (journalists) to secure results. I’m glad I got out of the game and went in-house — better money and work/life balance.”

—isabossy

9.

“90% of nonprofit jobs end up being sales. You’re a peddler. Maybe one person will leave and you can sit in the office, but so many have you hitting the pavement to get the word out. It’s not at all how they make it seem in movies, with people ‘fighting the good fight’ and protesting, etc. You go on the street with clipboards and have people sign shit, and we all hate those people for the most part.”

—witchyribbon84

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10.

“Physical therapy. The colleges totally lie to you, and I would not have done it if I knew how the industry really was. There are people who can really benefit from PT, but the system only cares about how MANY people we churn through, so we waste a looooot of time and insurance money with people who are unlikely to see a good outcome. I do my best to sign off on people who can’t benefit immediately, so I can spend more time with patients who really need it, but I sabotage my own job security that way. And you do NOT make enough money to justify that doctorate. Plus, the field is gonna be so saturated in a couple more years, there won’t even be jobs at all. DO NOT DO IT.”

—theluckyfrog

11.

“Zoo keeper/animal work in general, really. You have to have a degree to get your resume even looked at, so you start with crazy student debt. Then you graduate and think, ‘Yes, here we go.’ But you quickly learn there are about 1,000 other people that want that job, and if you don’t know someone or can afford to work free internships for years to get in, you just wasted all that time. Also, the job is not playing with tigers. The few years I spent working at a zoo, I spent less than half my day with the animals. It’s a lot of cleaning, measuring food, and cleaning again. OH, and there is, like, no good pay. Most of the facilities are working on tight budgets dependent on donors, so salaries are always low, and always looking for ways to get more people to help for free.”

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—p46bf3ddf0

12.

“My boyfriend is a chef. He works his ass off at least 70 hours a week and makes the equivalent of less than $12 an hour when you break it down. Meanwhile, line cooks are making bank on hourly wages and overtime. He has cuts, burns, scrapes, and chronic foot problems. It’s a brutal job with very demanding hours.”

—emilyh4c03a6db3

13.

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“Social services. I got a bachelors degree in social work and completed an unpaid internship for the entirety of my senior year. Six months after graduating and being unable to get a job in the field, I got a job in HR. They didn’t tell us until spring semester of senior year that we wouldn’t get hired without a master’s degree. My brother, who is an engineering major, is currently in a paid internship that pays almost as much as my job 🙃. Total scam.”

—hannahrxs

14.

“Psychology. I had to take a break after I got my bachelor’s, and getting back in is impossible. I need references from professors I haven’t seen in years and a completely pointless standardized test score (if I want to try for a traditional university). I don’t need either if I choose to go with an online program, but the cheapest program I found was $92,000 — PLUS all expenses for several multi-week in-person courses on their ‘campus.’ So airfare, a place to stay, food, plus anything I would need for the course. Oh, and to top it all off, upon further research, I found out there were two states that wouldn’t accept certification from these programs (Oregon and North Carolina), and I live in one of those.”

—jnjulian1983

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15.

“Floral designer. You either go to school for it, or you grow up in the business doing it. I’ve never met another good designer that wasn’t from a long line of family designers. I know for a fact that most florists aren’t going to hire you unless you are from a family of florists. It’s a super old school job at this point, and a dying career at that. Everyone thinks the job is so fun and wonderful, because you’re working with flowers all day. But they don’t think about how 80% of your orders are for funerals, 50% of your product is constantly being thrown out because it doesn’t last long enough, and you can’t predict what is going to sell. I have carpal tunnel in my wrist and a horrible back from lifting the water buckets constantly.”

—schleymanor


Oscar Wong / Getty Images

16.

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“I’m an academic librarian, and basically everything I learned in grad school is useless. A bunch of theoretical crap taught by people who’ve never done any actual work in a library. Luckily, I was able to get it finished in two years without much debt. What you need to know is how to manage people, deal with a budget that gets cut every year, and handle every kind of bizarre patron you can think of. I was burning out before 2020, and COVID just made it worse. If I didn’t have to rely on myself to pay for everything and keep the benefits, I would have quit a while ago.”

—harperbaby

17.

“Automotive tech. The starting pay for lube techs is around $9 a flat rate hour. Sure, it’s just changing oil and tires, but it’s still hard work and in the elements, since most shops are open-air shops. Growing takes more ASE certifications, which some employers may cover the cost of if you pass them. I know at least a dozen people in the field, and none of them make more than $1,000 a week, unless they take on side jobs. At least the tech schools aren’t crazy expensive.”

—graizen67

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18.

“Graphic design is a massive trap. My entire class fell for it, and now most are photographers. It seems promising, but it’s extremely competitive. So much so that you need experience to get an entry-level job.”

—Forlorn_Cyborg

19.

“Trap: Teaching English in Japan. It’s a job that’s ok for one year, and then gets worse and worse the longer you stay. Better to think of it as a means to explore Japan before getting a real job.”

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—teucer12


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20.

“Majoring in art. Unless you are really good and get really lucky, your real job will be a waiter or doing pharmaceutical testing. The odds are against you painting frescoes.”

—nightshade00013

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21.

“Call centers/customer services seem very, very promising at first. These companies keep telling you about fast promotions and shit, and then you get in, and it’s slavery in its most fancy form. You also forget what you have ever studied in your life, and you turn into a walking dead. You make money, and you don’t have time to spend it. Terrible job.”

—bewitched00

22.

“Publishing! Awful pay and a lot of awful people/horrible companies.”

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—Poofytail

23.

“Science and research in general. People think that you’re immediately going to discover a source of clean energy or figure out the cure for cancer. In reality, you’re probably going to spend five years of your life investigating one or two proteins on a random organism that may not even be relevant, because no one knows anything about them.”

—abdo1231997

24.

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“Anime and video game design. I taught design at a college, and there were so many neck beards who came through the program, all aspiring to work in anime and video game design. Zero of them ever got remotely close to earning a livable income. Lots of spec work. They probably would make more flipping burgers.”

—FistyMcTavish

25.

And finally, “I’ll say being a physician is getting financially worse than it used to be. After four years of college, four years of medical school, and residency + fellowship (which are typically six-ish years of postgraduate training), that’s 14 years total. You are 32-33 if you’ve taken zero breaks out of high school, and accumulated potentially 400-500k of debt if you had to pay for both college and medical school. These days you can become a PA or NP in a fraction of the time, with a fraction of the debt, and still make well over six figures.”

—TheGatsbyComplex

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What’s a career path that you think is a “trap”? Tell us in the comments for a chance to be featured in a BuzzFeed Community post!

Some submissions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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8 Remakes That Give Me Hope For The Future Of Filmmaking, And 8 That Prove Hollywood’s Out Of Ideas

Father of the Bride was just released on HBO Max last week. HBO Max This is the third film adaptation of the 1949 novel of the same name written by Edward Streeter. In 1950, the novel was adapted into a film starring Spencer Tracy and Elizabeth Taylor. Then, in 1991, it was remade with Steve…

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8 Remakes That Give Me Hope For The Future Of Filmmaking, And 8 That Prove Hollywood’s Out Of Ideas

Father of the Bride was just released on HBO Max last week.


HBO Max

This is the third film adaptation of the 1949 novel of the same name written by Edward Streeter. In 1950, the novel was adapted into a film starring Spencer Tracy and Elizabeth Taylor. Then, in 1991, it was remade with Steve Martin.


Touchstone Pictures

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The newest iteration of the film is a fresh new take on the story, with a Cuban-American family at the helm.


HBO Max

Sometimes, we get lucky and Hollywood will give us a remake that brings something new to the story. But, more often than not, we’re just watching a carbon copy of a movie that brought film execs financial success in the past.


Fox

So let’s take a look at 8 remakes that actually had something new to say, and 8 that seem a little TOO familiar if you ask me:

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1.

TOO SIMILAR — Little Women (2019)


Sony Pictures Releasing

This movie’s great, and it was nominated for tons of awards, BUT this is the SEVENTH film version of Little Women. There’s also been a miniseries, TV adaptations, musicals, and even an opera. That’s too many things, especially when the basic story is left relatively unchanged. Did Hollywood need to remake this, really? Or did they need to showcase the current who’s who of white millennial and Gen Z Hollywood for profit?

2.

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ADDED SOMETHING NEW — Annie (2014)


Columbia Pictures

This remake didn’t get the best reviews, but at least the filmmakers gave us something different. Annie had been made twice before this, with a pretty similar-looking cast both times. This 2014 Annie was the first version to be set in the present-day instead of the Great Depression. And, it was also the first version to cast Black actors as the two leads. (Jamie Foxx as Daddy Warbucks and Quvenzhané Wallis as Annie).

3.

TOO SIMILAR — Carrie (2013)

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Sony Pictures

The 2013 version of Carrie was supposed to be more of an adaptation of the original book rather than a remake of the 1976 De Palma classic, but it pretty much follows the original beat-for-beat.

There were definitely some stylistic differences, but this new version didn’t seem to update the look of Carrie’s mother and their house, or any of the creepy old-fashioned religious stuff either. It was so similar to the original that, at certain points, I forgot this was set in modern day.

Kimberly Peirce, the remake’s director, is an incredible filmmaker, and I think this was a case of the movie studio having too much input. They wanted to update Carrie, but instead of doing so in a meaningful way, they gave us the same old story but *now with cell phones!*

4.

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ADDED SOMETHING NEW — West Side Story (2021)


20th Century Studios

2021’s West Side Story was a hit with both audiences and critics. It followed the same storyline as the original from 1961, but incorporated a couple of changes. One major change was the role of Anybodys. In the original movie, Anybodys was a tomboy, but in the 2021 version, he is a trans man. This, along with casting actual Latinx actors to play characters that are Puerto Rican, gives the movie and its characters much more depth.

5.

TOO SIMILAR — Psycho (1998)

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Universal Pictures

There’s no doubt in my mind that this near shot-for-shot remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 classic Psycho should never have been made. Vince Vaughn? As Norman Bates? He wishes. 

I love Gus Van Sant, the director who made this, but like, if you have the go-ahead to remake one of the most beloved horror movies of all time, at least do something different. And I’m not talking about making it in color or adding a scene where Vince Vaughn’s Norman is jerking off to Marion Crane because those weren’t enough. Give me something different, something weirder! People are gonna compare your version to the original anyway, so if you do something completely out of left field, maybe they’d at least respect that. 

6.

ADDED SOMETHING NEW — Freaky Friday (2018)

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Disney

People regard the 2003 Lindsay Lohan/Jamie Lee Curtis Freaky Friday as the best version, and maybe even the only version. But, there have actually been three other adaptations of the movie. The newest one is a Disney Channel Original Movie, and it’s based on a musical of the same name. The movie itself is a bit strange and awkward, but the songs slap. It truly doesn’t feel like a remake. It’s its own thing, which is good, because I feel like Disney knows that if they tried to remake the 2003 one, there would be an uproar.

7.

TOO SIMILAR — A Christmas Carol


Walt Disney Pictures

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Okay, I’m not talking about a specific version of A Christmas Carol here, and more just like, all the versions. There’s just so many, and they keep coming out. Sure, there’ll be an original gem once in a while hidden among all the clones, but they’re pretty few and far between. And like, why even make another version afterThe Muppet Christmas Carol exists?

8.

ADDED SOMETHING NEW (but just barely) — Pet Sematary (2019)


Paramount Pictures Studios

The Pet Sematary remake made some pretty big changes from the original 1989 version. The plot is basically the same: in both films, a family moves into a new house, one of their kids gets hit by a truck, they bury the kid in a cemetery that brings the dead back to life, and the kid comes back wrong and kills people. In the original, the family’s very young son Gage dies, while in the remake, it’s the older sister Ellie that gets run over. 

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By changing which kid dies, the new Pet Sematary tried to do something different, so I’ll give them that. But, I think it actually just made the story super boring. A toddler zombie boy is just always gonna be scarier to me than the overused trope of a creepy little girl. But A for effort!

9.

TOO SIMILAR — The Amazing Spider-Man (2012)


Sony Pictures

In 2002 Sam Raimi gave us the iconic Spider-Man starring Tobey Maguire, which led to the greatest superhero movie of all time, Spider-Man 2, and, of course, the notoriously campy Spider-Man 3. Just five short years after the third entry, Sony gave us The Amazing Spider-Man starring Andrew Garfield. Not only did we have to see the whole spider bite/transformation stuff all over again, but we had to witness Uncle Ben’s death a second time, all while Raimi’s franchise was still pretty fresh in our minds.

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But I guess it was all worth it when both Maguire and Garfield returned in 2021’s Spider-Man: No Way Home to join Tom Holland’s version of Spider-Man for an interdimensional team-up.

10.

ADDED SOMETHING NEW — Ghostbusters (2016)


Columbia Pictures

Many people hated the 2016 remake of Ghostbusters. Some thought it was a gimmick, but we can all agree that it brought something new to the table. It was an all-female team of Ghostbusters this time. And while it wasn’t the greatest movie ever made, it tried something different. 

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The release of the new Ghostbusters and the subsequent backlash it received prompted a lot of discourse regarding gender and fan culture, but nothing really came of it. If Hollywood made a gender-swapped Indiana Jones right now, I’m sure the fans would react the same exact way they responded to Ghostbusters. This is exactly why Hollywood needs to keep taking chances like this. So that, eventually, everyone will be able to see themselves on screen.

11.

TOO SIMILAR — Cinderella (2015)


Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Disney’s recent trend of remaking their animated films into live-action versions seems to me like a HUGE missed opportunity, especially with Cinderella. We’ve seen the animated version from 1950 a hundred times. We’re so familiar with the characters and the storyline, that it’s boring to see the same thing again, even if it’s being done with real live actors. Instead of casting an actor that looks identical to a cartoon character that was drawn over 60 years ago, why not cast someone completely different? Or maybe change the plot slightly, or add a twist ending?

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There are dozens of similar adaptations of Cinderella. Unless someone adds something new to the mix, can we just stop making these movies? I mean, I can only take so many dead dads, big gown reveals, and unexplained musical interludes.

12.

ADDED SOMETHING NEW — The Mummy (1999)


Universal Pictures

The Mummy remake was a huge success. It led to two sequels and launched The Scorpion King franchise. The film that it was based on was a horror movie, 1932’s The Mummy starring Boris Karloff. The remake, however, was an action-adventure film with Brendan Frasier at the helm.

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I want to say that the reason this remake is not just a carbon copy of the original is because the plot, the characters, and the genre are completely different. But, while that’s true, the “something new” that sets this film apart from the original is, in fact, Brendan Fraser.

Fraser’s Rick O’Connell is a true himbo, an icon of his time, and the whole reason why when someone mentions The Mummy there’s no way you’re thinking of the 1932 version.

13.

TOO SIMILAR — A Star is Born (2018)


Warner Bros. Pictures

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The latest, and fourth, adaption of A Star is Born, was similar to its Barbra Streisand-led 1976 predecessor. Yes, there were several changes, but that wasn’t enough for some people, namely Barbra Streisand who struggled with its originality. She has said that the Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper film was too close to her version and essentially “the wrong idea.”

She was quoted as saying, “I can’t argue with success, but I don’t care so much about success as I do originality.” 

I love the sentiment, Barbra. Go shake things up in Hollywood.

14.

ADDED SOMETHING NEW — The Great Gatsby (2013)

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Warner Bros. Pictures

Whether you like him or not, Baz Luhrmann always gives us a cinematic extravaganza. Watching one of his movies is an event. 

In his 2013 interpretation of The Great Gatsby, he mixes old eras with modern music, his sets and costumes are over-the-top, and everything you see looks almost surreal. It oozes decadence and opulence and sometimes it’s even too much to look at. And, we already have a straightforward retelling of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel in 1979’s The Great Gatsby starring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow. Baz Luhrmann knew that. So he gave us Gatsby through his eyes. He did what a remake should do: update an old story for a modern audience.

15.

TOO SIMILAR — Funny Games (2007)

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Madman Entertainment, Warner Independent

In 1997, director Michael Haneke released his Austrian thriller Funny Games. He had always wanted to set it in America, so ten years later, he made it again with American actors in a shot-for-shot remake.

Because it’s made by the same director, the 2007 version is equally as scary and effective as its ’90s precursor.

These movies aren’t just siblings, they’re identical twins, and you can’t really choose one over the other. It’s like that old “spot the imposter” trope where the villain’s disguised themselves as the hero’s friend and they both try to convince the hero that the other one is the imposter.

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16.

ADDED SOMETHING NEW — Little Shop of Horrors (1986)


Warner Bros. Pictures

1986’s Little Shop of Horrors is based on a musical from 1982, which is based on a horror comedy film from 1960. 

The musical stars America’s sweetheart Rick Moranis as Seymour in a career-defining performance (Spaceballs who?). The music was written and composed by Howard Ashman and EGOT-winner Alan Menken. They would go on to write the music for The Little MermaidBeauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. 

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The film was nominated for two Oscars and is now considered an absolute classic. By turning the original into a musical, the remake, while still keeping its horror-comedy tone, can totally stand on its own.

Let us know which remakes you thought added something new to the source material and which ones were too similar.

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26 Pairs Of Shoes So Comfortable You May Be Tempted To Cry Tears Of Joy

22. Adorable ankle-strap sandals with a chunky heel for extra comfort so you can walk all day looking fa-bu-lous. amazon.com, amazon.com Promising review: “Love love love these shoes!!!!! I don’t normally buy cheap shoes because my feet suffer. But I just wanted a really cute low-heel, open-toe sandal to wear to my sister’s wedding. I…

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26 Pairs Of Shoes So Comfortable You May Be Tempted To Cry Tears Of Joy

22.

Adorable ankle-strap sandals with a chunky heel for extra comfort so you can walk all day looking fa-bu-lous.

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amazon.com, amazon.com

Promising review: “Love love love these shoes!!!!! I don’t normally buy cheap shoes because my feet suffer. But I just wanted a really cute low-heel, open-toe sandal to wear to my sister’s wedding. I knew I would probably just wear them one time, so I didn’t want to spend a ton of money. These shoes are gorgeous, comfortable, and I just ordered them in two other colors!!! You can dress them up or dress them down, so they are totally versatile!” —Leah

Get them from Amazon for $34.99 (available in sizes 5.5–11 and in 25 colors).

Psst: This item is included in Prime Wardrobe, so you can give it a trial run if you’re a member!

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